Close relations matter: the association between depression and refugee status in the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA)

Author
Lin, Shen (Lamson)
Kobayashi, Karen
Tong, Hongmei
Davison, Karen M.
Arora, Simran R. A.
Fuller‑Thomson, Esme
Faculty Advisor
Date
2020
Keywords
Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA) , social determinants of mental health , depression , social support , social isolation
Abstract (summary)
This study examined the prevalence and social determinants of depression among refugee and non-refugee adults aged 45–85 in the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging. Bivariate analyses and multivariable binary logistic regression analyses were conducted. The prevalence of depression was higher in a sample of 272 refugees (22.1%) and 5059 non-refugee immigrants (16.6%), compared to 24,339 native-born Canadians (15.2%). The adjusted odds ratio (aOR) of depression for refugees were not attenuated when controlling factors such as, (1) socioeconomic status, (2) health conditions and behaviours, (3) social isolation and online social networking (aORs range from 1.61 to 1.70, p’s < 0.05). However, when social support representing close personal relationships was included, the odds of depression for refugees were reduced to non-significance (aOR = 1.30, 95% CI 0.97–1.74, p = 0.08). Refugees’ excess vulnerability to depression is mainly attributable to lower levels of affectionate social support. Targeted interventions in nurturing supportive interpersonal relationships for refugees are warranted.
Publication Information
Lin, S., Kobayashi, L., Tong, H. M., Davison, K., Simran R. A. & Fuller-Thomson., E. (2020). Close relations matter: The association between depression and refugee status in the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA). Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, 22, 946-956. doi:10.1007/s10903-020-00980-0
Notes
Item Type
Article
Language
English
Rights
All Rights Reserved