A discussion between Charles Tart and Lucidity Letter editor, Jayne Gackenbach, examining similarities between dream lucidity, witnessing and self-remembering

Author
Tart, Charles
Gackenbach, Jayne
Faculty Advisor
Date
1988
Keywords
lucid dreaming , spiritual traditions , witnessing , Waking Up , Charles Tart , behavior therapy
Abstract (summary)
Gackenbach: In a recent review of your book Waking Up, John Wren-Lewis said it was very relevant to those interested in lucid dreaming. Tart: I was very honored that he would say that it is must reading for people who are into lucid dreams since lucid dreaming is mentioned only once in the book. You see, lucid waking is the topic of greatest interest to me nowadays. Some spiritual traditions use an analogy that we live in a dream. In many dreams, you get pushed around by events. You’re not very smart. You don’t re-member important, relevant knowledge. You’re inconsistent. You don’t call on all your resources. You get in these terrible situations, but then you wake up! Not only does the dream problem disappear, but you’re so much smarter by comparison. Smarter from the point of view of the waking state, right?
Publication Information
Tart, C. & Gackenbach, J.I. (1988). A discussion between Charles Tart and Lucidity Letter editor, Jayne Gackenbach, examining similarities between dream lucidity, witnessing and self-remembering. Lucidity Letter, 7(2) and reprinted in Lucidity: Commemorative Issue 10th Anniversary of Lucidity Letter, 10(1&2), 121-128.
DOI
Notes
Item Type
Article
Language
English
Rights
All Rights Reserved