Tierra prometida – Spain as Jewish past and future

dc.contributor.authorKatz, Marco
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-08
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-28T00:38:33Z
dc.date.available2022-05-28T00:38:33Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.descriptionPresented on March 18, 2016 at the American Comparative Literature Association Annual Meeting held at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
dc.description.abstract“[H]e told me,” writes Benito Pérez Galdós, “that the Jews either had no country or had two, their current home or their traditional one, Spain”1 (224). [Vocal rendition of “Hevenu Shalom Aleichem / La paz esté con vosotros” in Hebrew and Spanish.] “Hevenu Shalom Aleichem,” a melody I recall from as long as I have memories. “Hevenu shalom Aleichem. Hevenu shalom Aleichem. Hevenu shalom Aleichem. Hevenu shalom, shalom, shalom Aleichem.” I also remember it this way: “La paz esté con vosotros. La paz esté con vosotros. La paz esté con vosotros y con vosotros siempre, siempre esté en paz.” A cosmopolitan song for wandering people. The apogee of this cosmopolitan took place under Islamic rule of a Peninsula that created the conditions for what we now call modern Jewish culture. Today, I consider how cosmopolitanism led Jews to become Spanish, then survive and sometimes flourish as Spaniards in America, and finally infect Spanish Americans with cosmopolitanism.
dc.format.extent108.83 KB
dc.format.mimetypePDF
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14078/1049
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserved
dc.subjectSpanish Jews
dc.subjectcosmopolitanism
dc.titleTierra prometida – Spain as Jewish past and future
dc.typePresentation
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