Gender Studies - Student Works

Permanent link for this collection

Browse

Recent Submissions

Now showing 1 - 5 of 8
  • Item
    Exploring queer joy: the importance of positive LGBTQ+ narratives
    (2020) Heber, Janine; Biittner, Katie
    Media is a powerful tool for socializing society about norms. Media portrayals of LGBTQ+ narratives often reinforce heteronormative ideals in society. Lack of representation or narratives that exploit the trauma of LGBTQ+ characters can lead to associations of queerness with negative outcomes and unhappiness. However, LGBTQ+ narratives that focus on the joy and happiness between characters can serve as a catalyst for acceptance. As such, it is important to celebrate and highlight series like Schitt’s Creek which intentionally show the tenderness, happiness, acceptance, and love of LGBTQ+ characters. The centre of the hoop is the hand embroidered image from the show's billboard. In an interview, Daniel Levy, the co-creator of Schitt’s Creek, shared that he wanted to do something bold for the final season and that his younger self would never have dreamed of seeing a billboard with two men kissing. Many fans have taken photos in front of the billboard to share their acceptance and celebration of queer love. When young sunflowers grow, they turn towards the direction of the sunlight during the day and reverse course at dawn so they are ready for morning. A study by Harmer in 2016 found that restricted sunflowers that were unable to turn were smaller in size and had fewer petals. In the same way, lack of positive LGBTQ+ narratives negatively impact the lives of LGBTQ+ people. Here, the border of sunflowers represents a collective turning towards LGBTQ+ joy, health, and happiness. When we celebrate and support positive and healthy LGBTQ+ media representations, like the sunflowers in sunlight, we can all flourish and grow.
  • Item
    Detail of exploring queer joy: the importance of positive LGBTQ+ narratives
    (2020) Heber, Janine; Biittner, Katie
    Media is a powerful tool for socializing society about norms. Media portrayals of LGBTQ+ narratives often reinforce heteronormative ideals in society. Lack of representation or narratives that exploit the trauma of LGBTQ+ characters can lead to associations of queerness with negative outcomes and unhappiness. However, LGBTQ+ narratives that focus on the joy and happiness between characters can serve as a catalyst for acceptance. As such, it is important to celebrate and highlight series like Schitt’s Creek which intentionally show the tenderness, happiness, acceptance, and love of LGBTQ+ characters. The centre of the hoop is the hand embroidered image from the show's billboard. In an interview, Daniel Levy, the co-creator of Schitt’s Creek, shared that he wanted to do something bold for the final season and that his younger self would never have dreamed of seeing a billboard with two men kissing. Many fans have taken photos in front of the billboard to share their acceptance and celebration of queer love. When young sunflowers grow, they turn towards the direction of the sunlight during the day and reverse course at dawn so they are ready for morning. A study by Harmer in 2016 found that restricted sunflowers that were unable to turn were smaller in size and had fewer petals. In the same way, lack of positive LGBTQ+ narratives negatively impact the lives of LGBTQ+ people. Here, the border of sunflowers represents a collective turning towards LGBTQ+ joy, health, and happiness. When we celebrate and support positive and healthy LGBTQ+ media representations, like the sunflowers in sunlight, we can all flourish and grow.
  • Item
    The male glaze
    (2019) Johnson, Andréa; Holland, Kathryn
    ‘The Male Glaze’ is a blog-style, un-essay project in response to the topic of companion texts in feminism and how they create meaning for their readers via intertextual relationships. This project identifies intertextual features in feminist texts that explore the importance of those features for our understanding of the texts and the issues they address.
  • Item
    An immodest demand: Valerie Solanas and SCUM Manifesto
    (2019) Gibbs, Autumn; Holland, Kathryn
    This presentation explores the "outlaw text" status of SCUM Manifesto, written in 1967 by Valerie Solanas, through its lack of impact upon the culture in the time it was published and now. Solanas and her manifesto have largely been left behind in the turbulent wake of second-wave feminism. The accompanying paper, written for one of the inaugural classes of Gender Studies 219, argues for increased visibility and analysis of the manifesto in feminism, academia, and popular culture.
  • Item
    An immodest demand — quotes on Valerie Solanas and SCUM Manifesto
    (2019) Gibbs, Autumn; Holland, Kathryn
    This handout explores the "outlaw text" status of SCUM Manifesto, written in 1967 by Valerie Solanas, through its lack of impact upon the culture in the time it was published and now. Solanas and her manifesto have largely been left behind in the turbulent wake of second-wave feminism.